RSS

A populist plan to propel Republicans into relevance.

15 Sep

I might be full of shit, but at least the title has a nice, alliterative bounce to it. Anyway, here goes…

It’s pretty much common wisdom (except among certain Republican factions who seem to prefer auguring the party into the ground for the sake of ideological purity) that unless the Republican party comes up with a way to attract more minority voters they’re pretty much doomed as a national party. But how can they possibly do that and stay true to their principles? Up to now I kinda thought that the best strategy would be to placate the Hispanic community with some sort of sensible immigration plan because, well, based on most of the other issues of particular importance to that community as a whole, they really should be leaning heavily Republican.

[I mentioned my wife at this point in the original post. My intentions were innocent enough, but I realize now that I should not have done that. My sincerest apologies to everyone concerned — especially my wife.]

Then along comes this article, which makes the following point:

“A better minority outreach can be found in libertarian populism.

The libertarian populist argument is that the game is rigged in favor of the big and well-connected and against the small and unconnected. This argument should be aimed mainly at the “47 percent” that Mitt Romney wrote off and denigrated: working-class voters who find it hard to get ahead…

It’s hard for Republicans to appeal to minorities, as minorities, because Democrats are always better at identity politics among non-whites. But this is where libertarian populism comes in. Republicans can reach out to minorities in their roles as parents, taxpayers and small businessmen.”

The author of the piece then starts to flesh out his argument… Revamp the payroll tax structure, which is currently regressive…  Emphasize school choice and education reform… Clear out government hurdles to small business formation… Curb eminent domain powers…

By jove, I think he has something! One thing I’d add to his ideas is this: increase inheritance taxes. One primary pillar upon which America was built was the belief in personal merit, not who your parents were. To achieve that we must weaken that generational bond because, after all, that is the fuel of elitism.

Anyone have any other thoughts?

Advertisements
 
36 Comments

Posted by on September 15, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

36 responses to “A populist plan to propel Republicans into relevance.

  1. Cluster

    September 15, 2013 at 2:18 pm

    I think your wife spends too much time around you. You might want to tell her that SB1070 is simply a mirror of the federal law that goes unenforced and as an American citizen her fears of being in AZ are irrational, but then again she is married to you.

    I do agree with the libertarian populist ideas, which can be expanded, but the inheritance tax is just a simplistic (I know you like that word), feel good and meaningless effort. That is money that has already been taxed and doesn’t belong to the government.

    And speaking of becoming irrelevant – how about those two Colorado Democrat Senators who are unemployed?

     
  2. Cluster

    September 15, 2013 at 2:22 pm

    And far it be of me to defend the GOP, but you should have considered this before writing your post:

    30 states have Republican governors, and in all but five of those (Iowa, Maine, New Jersey, New Mexico and Nevada) have the GOP also controlling the state legislature. (Nebraska has a unicameral, non-partisan legislature.) What’s more, Republican state legislative majorities in 14 states (including two with Democratic governors, Arkansas and Missouri) are strong enough to override gubernatorial vetoes.

     
    • kmg

      September 15, 2013 at 3:02 pm

      Do you think that is primarily due to the majority supporting Republican policies or is it due to gerrymandering?

       
      • Cluster

        September 15, 2013 at 3:12 pm

        It must be a fluke KMG. Everyone knows that people prefer the high unemployment, high taxes, part time, low wages, gun control, and abortion on demand policies of the Democrats.

        I mean why wouldn’t you? Those are just good sound policies.

         
      • kmg

        September 15, 2013 at 3:16 pm

        I take it from your response that you don’t think gerrymandering played any role. You would be mistaken.

         
    • ricorun

      September 15, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Cluster: And far it be of me to defend the GOP, but you should have considered this before writing your post…

      I did, and I’m still good. But thanks for your concern. It was touching.

       
  3. Cluster

    September 15, 2013 at 2:42 pm

    You know in my entire life I have never seem this country in worse shape economically, socially, politically, or as weak on the international stage, and yet you and your wife are concerned about AZ 1070? Talk about simplistic.

    And considering the horrible situation that our country is currently mired in, you consider the Republicans to be in trouble? I guess you would have to have the gray matter of endangered salmon to buy into that notion.

     
    • ricorun

      September 15, 2013 at 4:57 pm

      Cluster; You know in my entire life I have never seem this country in worse shape economically, socially, politically, or as weak on the international stage, and yet you and your wife are concerned about AZ 1070? Talk about simplistic.

      Oh boy, what a personally provocative thing to say. And for what reason? You can try to make it as personal as you want, but the fact of the matter is that it’s not just me and my wife. And to the extent that you think so simplistically doesn’t bode well for your party, whatever it is.

       
      • casper

        September 16, 2013 at 6:04 pm

        “You can try to make it as personal as you want, but the fact of the matter is that it’s not just me and my wife.”

        My daughter’s boyfriend is Hispanic, a third generation American, and owner of a Bronze Star he received for his service in Iraq. He wouldn’t be caught dead in AZ because of AZ 1070. He’s sure he would be pulled over anytime he drove down the street. Like it or not, he’s not alone in that perception.

         
      • Cluster

        September 17, 2013 at 6:02 am

        I have to admit that these anecdotal accounts from you and Rico re: AZ are hilarious. You do know that I live here, right? And you’re trying to convince me that this is some paranoid, draconian state seeking out evil people with suspect ethnicity? Let me shed a little light on your irrational paranoia – my business partners wife is 100% Mexican and an American citizen. She loves the law and has never, ever been bothered. I work with A LOT of Hispanics who have never been pulled over, frisked, thrown in prison, or even looked at twice. But don’t let facts scare your brave military relative, ok? In fact, how about if you just stay up there in that safe little “white” enclave of Wyoming.

         
    • ricorun

      September 17, 2013 at 5:06 pm

      Cluster: I have to admit that these anecdotal accounts from you and Rico re: AZ are hilarious. You do know that I live here, right?

      I heard you lived in AZ but I haven’t been inclined to track you back or anything to confirm it 🙂 But it’s not just anecdotal accounts that suggest SB 1070 have driven people away from AZ.

       
      • Cluster

        September 17, 2013 at 5:24 pm

        The Center for American Progress? Is there any chance you can find an article from a further left publication? Maybe Pravda?

        AZ is doing just fine, but thanks for your concern. In fact State Farm just announced that they are moving their regional headquarters here and adding 5,000 to 7,000 employees. And guess where they are moving from? Illinois. Thank you Obama. And speaking of that, you might want to focus your great concern towards the state of Illinois and the city of Chicago to be specific. More violent crime there then in Afghanistan, and that’s a deeply blue city and state. I think they need your help more than we do.

         
      • ricorun

        September 17, 2013 at 6:32 pm

        Cluster: The Center for American Progress? Is there any chance you can find an article from a further left publication?

        And you should talk, why? But that’s only relevant in lesson #2. Continuing with lesson #1… regardless of perceived ideological differences. do you notice a very important distinction between the article I cited and the ones you’re prone to cite? Did you notice that the article I cited documents pretty much everything they say, while yours do not? You need to understand the importance of that. Otherwise we can never proceed to lesson #2.

         
      • Cluster

        September 17, 2013 at 7:35 pm

        You have to be kidding me right? The links in the CFP article linked to other CFP articles, editorials, and and/or interviews which are all based on conjecture. And if you actually think farmers let there crop go unpicked, you don’t know any farmers. I work with them all the time right here in good ole AZ. Housing demand in AZ is exploding mainly due industry moving in, and the Scottsdale Tourism board has been reporting record tourism so far this year so your CFP article is worthless. Now I am not saying that some tourists stayed away, some illegal immigrants have left, or that there was some small negative impact, but you need to concern yourself with a real problem, because your CFP is just another problems liberals like to fluff up.

        I did like the “non binding resolution” under San Francisco on the list of cities who have boycotted us. That takes some real courage to do that.

         
      • Cluster

        September 17, 2013 at 7:49 pm

        Here’s some hard date Rico.

        http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LASST04000003

        Notice the rate between the period of 2006-2007, 3%-5%, meaning when the crash it we had a long way to fall and that has nothing to do with SB1070, but the unemployment rate has been dropping since 2010, and our rate has been consistent if not below national average since the crash.

         
      • ricorun

        September 18, 2013 at 2:57 pm

        Cluster, your own statistics show a drop in the AZ workforce of over 3.8% (over 115,000 people) since the beginning of 2010. Your own statistics show that AZ is still shedding jobs. I’d say you just proved my point with your own “hard data”. Awesome job, dude!

         
      • Cluster

        September 19, 2013 at 5:29 am

        Remember when I pointed out that AZ was at 3% unemployment in 2006? How sustainable do you think that is? Illegals are leaving the state due to the loss of job in the housing industry and all it’s satellite work: ie; landscaping. New housing is just now starting up again. But our labor participation force is still better than the national average.

        Keep trying to find that problem.

         
  4. mitchethekid

    September 15, 2013 at 4:27 pm

    I guess with economics in mind, you don’t remember the very early ’70’s. The early 80’s when the prime rate was 25% or from a historical perspective, the depression.
    Instead of US automakers responding to the changing environment of the market vis a vis gas prices, they lobbied the government to mandate a 55MPH speed limit. That worked out well. Funny how during the first weeks of WWII they could pivot and go from manufacturing automobiles to manufacturing tanks and gull winged Corsairs.

    The situation that Rico described goes back further than the early 70’s. It goes back to the 1968 election of Richard Nixon and his collaboration with Roger Alies and Lee Atwater. I’m sure you are familiar with Joe McGinnis, the author of The Making of the President.
    The cynicism of Nixon, aided and abetted by Atwater and his “Southern Strategy” were at the time unprecedented in American electoral politics. This “strategy” was further enhanced by the ruthlessness of Nixon, his paranoia, his resentment of the Ivy League educated “elitists” and his grandiose paranoia. (See the recently released tapes which confirm not only this, but his Anti-Semitism.)
    Through cunning: appealing to a genial, Rockwellian non activist populace, one that was becoming increasing alarmed at the rapid changes in society (i.e. Civil rights, Roe v Wade, a disconnect from their own dope smoking long haired morality of the Vietnam War questioning rock and roll listening to children and grandchildren) the first brick was put down to what we have left today of the once grand and great Republican Party. Over the course of 30 yrs, with promises made to those folks at every election; in order to get elected, and with each promise unfulfilled we now have a party that has been eviscerated from the inside out. And at their own hands and by a monster of their own time consuming making.
    What is left are Xenophobes who are so far off into space that they are convinced the President of the United States is not only from another country, but another planet. And one that is to boot, hostile and dedicated to the destruction of the very idyllic idea of America. We have huge swaths of people who want to instill what is essentially Dominionist government, complete with Sharia law, except that they are radical Christians, not radical Muslims. We have government officials who wear their contempt for the poor as a badge of honor and use it as a platform for reelection. We have states who want to impose ID as an “alternative” to fact based, emotionless science. We have elected officials whose contempt for the President and the modernity he represents who are cheer leading for default on our previously committed to financial obligations if they don’t get their own way by defunding ACH. For the 42nd time. I guess they would rather step over dead bodies in the streets rather than accept reality and compromise. We have people on governmental committees who deny facts and are unmoved by new information. We have a mile high mountain state where the water flows downhill, which has flooded in the past 36 hrs and yet global warming is a hoax perpetrated by those same dope smoking hippie scientists. And let’s not forget state legislatures who are doing everything they can to prevent people who don’t vote for them from voting at all.
    It is in cases like these that the best thought out plans of mice and men come to naught. There is no more Republican Party, nor do I believe that there are any more traditional conservatives. Conservatives along the lines of a Wm. F. Buckley or (gasp!) Barry Goldwater.
    No, what is left is the distillation of ideological purity into an overwhelming poison. Sugar beets into teeth rotting white sugar. Coca leaves into crack and the lovely and beautiful Poppy Flower into heroin.
    This Rico, is the current state of Republican / Conservative ideological evolution. And if you know anything about the mechanics of evolution, it isn’t the strongest or the smartest that survive, it’s the most adaptable to change. I think they said “Thanks but no thanks” a long time ago.”We’ll just sit this one out and watch”. “We’ll be able to tell when you are just a mist of vapor on the playing field, thanks again though!”
    And have a lovely evening…..

     
  5. ricorun

    September 15, 2013 at 5:18 pm

    Mitch: There is no more Republican Party, nor do I believe that there are any more traditional conservatives. Conservatives along the lines of a Wm. F. Buckley or (gasp!) Barry Goldwater.

    <>

    But what a tour de force, Mitch! Cluster, you need to kick some serious ass!

     
    • mitchethekid

      September 15, 2013 at 5:59 pm

      Do you mean “What a toure de force” or A toure de force? And what’s with the but part?? But means with the exception of.
      I have to go now. Breaking Bad is on the TV.

       
  6. GMB

    September 16, 2013 at 5:49 am

    Rico, your concern about the repub party is touching. Have you shared with mr. preibus? The problem is not with us purity types. The problem is with those who have accepted your advice about expanding the big tent.

    Catering to every aggrieved group has gained the party less than nothing. It has driven quite a bit of the base away, including my wife and I. We will stay away until the either the party does disappear or until they get their act together.

    Romney was the last ride of wild rino for millions of us. I think the party will collapse as a force in American politics if fat man from joisey or prince jebward the 467 are it’s nominee and looses next time around.

    So be it.

     
    • Cluster

      September 16, 2013 at 6:05 am

      It is touching, and makes me a little emotional. If only the Republicans were more like the Democrats – oh wait ……they are.

      Never mind.

       
    • mitchethekid

      September 16, 2013 at 7:24 am

      The irony of your comment is, well just so ironic. The party is an aggrieved group. And the base is even more so. It is on this basis, and the fact that the Republicans are so out of touch, so obsessed with social issues, determined to promote chaos and anarchy that they will collapse as a political party. They are no longer conservative, rather they are radicals. They are not the least bit interested in governing and they no longer can promote what they are for, only what they are against which more often than not is their own ideas! (See definition of black`track)
      For a few yrs now, I have heard people much more informed than I saying that if the party doesn’t accept the need for truly transformative change they will be reduced to an insignificant regional party. Heck, they didn’t even take the advise of their own “autopsy” back a few months ago. After losing 4 out of the past 6 Presidential elections, you’d think they’d wise up. But GMB, perhaps you are correct. Why would you want to support a party that’s to stupid to take their own advise? I’m curious though, and I mean this with all respect and sincerity, whom to you think would be a good conservative / Republican nominee? One who accepts the changed nature of the times, the demographics, the issues and of course the world?

      http://www.salon.com/2013/09/16/7_crazy_right_wing_statements_from_just_last_week_partner/

      Would that the GOP of today learn that lesson of the great and powerful King Ozymandias and remember that empires built on sand will return to sand sooner than they ever anticipate.

      I met a traveller from an antique land
      Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
      Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
      Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
      And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
      Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
      Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
      The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
      And on the pedestal these words appear:
      “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
      Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
      Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
      Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
      The lone and level sands stretch far away.

       
    • meursault1942

      September 17, 2013 at 10:20 pm

      “I think the party will collapse as a force in American politics if fat man from joisey or prince jebward the 467 are it’s nominee and looses next time around.”

      Here’s something I’ve pondered from time to time:

      Let’s say the GOP does collapse as a force in American politics. Then let’s say that in the aftermath of that, the Democratic party collapses as well (which I could definitely see happening–that party is rife with “My pet issue is the single most important issue, and we must address it exactly my way RIGHT NOW!” attitudes). So what happens then? Do we end up with a bunch of smaller factions? Do the two parties essentially reform under new names? Do we get two parties at the national level, but much smaller parties at the state and local levels?

      I guess what I’m asking is if the two-party system is the natural order of things in American politics or if it’s being held up mostly by inertia.

       
      • Cluster

        September 18, 2013 at 5:17 am

        That is an excellent question, and I am not sure I can even wager a guess at this point. It would also make an excellent article for discussion. My hunch is that the parties the selves wouldn’t collapse, but the leadership and “controlling mechanisms” would. By that I mean the GOP elite of McCain, Boehner, Rove, the Bush’s, and finding sources of Koch’s, and a few other big sources, would suddenly lose influence, if not their position altogether and new players would emerge ie; Walker, Paul, Lee, Croz, etc.. In fact, that is where the the base is headed anyway.

        On the other side, people like The Clinton’s, Reid, Schumer, Pelosi, and the money from Soros, and the Unions would not longer hold any sway, and people like, Tammy Duckworth, (can’t think of anymore), would emerge.

        What I am saying is that I think the tentacles of each party are long and deep enough to survive, but it will take new leadership, new money and new energy to sustain. I think each party is getting old and stale.

         
  7. GMB

    September 16, 2013 at 8:22 am

    Who would make a good candidate? About the only one I could think of right now would be Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin. I could vote for him in the next election for POTUS and not want to puke afterwards.

    He has shown that he can take the battle to the progressive machine and throw the monkey wrenches that foul it up..

    He hasn’t got the slightest chance in hell of being the repub nominee though. preibus rience has already determined it will the fat man or another bush.

     
    • ricorun

      September 19, 2013 at 7:13 pm

      Oh come on, even if Scott Walker becomes a nominee, I’m sure you’ll find something somewhere along the line about which to think he’s too “squishy” regarding your own personal, heartfelt, non-negotiable issues. For example, imagine if he came out SUPPORTING the consensus on global warming, and/or if he came out SUPPORTING the teaching of evolution in schools and NOT teaching other sorts of bullshit like ID in science classrooms. Would you be good with that?

       
      • GMB

        September 21, 2013 at 6:19 am

        Well since I am taking a small break here and trying to catch up on my reading, which is sorely lacking these days, let me respond.

        The “consensus” is falling apart more everyday. The fact that governments around the world have been found out to be urging the useless nations and pachuri richenda to lie about about the “consensus” has not helped one of your pet non issues..

        You can teach the falsehood of evolution all you want in science class. You can ask piltdown man, he agrees.

        I have never urged the teaching of ID in any class at all. In fact ID is as useless as useless nations are. Just an attempt by fence sitters to placate the proggies by meeting them halfway.

        Yawn.

        And on the sixth day God “intelligently designed” man.

        Would it be un-christian to laugh my ass off that?

        🙂

         
      • mitchethekid

        September 21, 2013 at 7:39 am

        Please provide evidence that disproves evolution. You have heard of the flu, have you not? And while you’re at it, please prove the existence of god without using faith as evidence. As I understand it, the Bible is an allegory, it is not literal for it was, the evolution of language has changed the original wording and hence the meaning.

         
  8. bardolf2

    September 16, 2013 at 10:43 am

    “… based on most of the other issues of particular importance to that community as a whole, they really should be leaning heavily Republican.” – ricorun

    huh? There is a fundamental misunderstanding that the Hispanic community is socially conservative if not economically conservative. That’s not the case under almost any metric.

    I agree with rico in the populist approach, but maybe more hands on and less abstract. The way out for the GOP is returning people to the land/workshop/craft studio. Encourage gardens, raising poultry, a do-it-yourself culture and especially a culture of exchange of goods and ideas which eliminate the banks/big_corporations/big_government.

    When the economy allows person X to meet his/her basic++ needs if he/she simply puts in 6 hours of work every day on average without regard to education, location, … depending only on the willingness to work, well then most of the Dem policies collapse.

    Health care is a problem that will nag the GOP forever unless it figures out a way to control those costs for the middle class. Universal health care becomes inevitable unless the GOP offers a better solution.

     
    • meursault1942

      September 17, 2013 at 1:41 pm

      “Encourage gardens, raising poultry, a do-it-yourself culture and especially a culture of exchange of goods and ideas ”

      Urban hipsters are already doing a lot of this stuff (the chicken-raising thing is some serious dilettanteism, though, as they just dump the chickens in shelters when they’re done with them), but they sure aren’t voting Republican.

       
    • ricorun

      September 17, 2013 at 2:34 pm

      baldorf: I agree with rico in the populist approach, but maybe more hands on and less abstract. The way out for the GOP is returning people to the land/workshop/craft studio. Encourage gardens, raising poultry, a do-it-yourself culture and especially a culture of exchange of goods and ideas which eliminate the banks/big_corporations/big_government.

      I’m pretty sure emphasizing a minimalist, low tech lifestyle is the way to go. That would be worse suicide than the GOP is practicing now. However, I’m all for eliminating anything that’s “too big to fail” in favor of increased competition and entrepreneurialism. I also think trying to eliminate/curtail regulation before eliminating “too big to fail” entities is the worst idea imaginable.

       
      • ricorun

        September 17, 2013 at 2:35 pm

        Oops… I meant to say, “I’m pretty sure emphasizing a minimalist, low tech lifestyle is NOT the way to go.” Sorry.

         
      • Cluster

        September 17, 2013 at 2:56 pm

        I would hope everyone could agree though that our current regulations, in nearly every industry, need a thorough review. There is so much duplicity and needless costs that a small fortune could be saved in the process.

         
      • ricorun

        September 17, 2013 at 3:55 pm

        Cluster: I would hope everyone could agree though that our current regulations, in nearly every industry, need a thorough review. There is so much duplicity and needless costs that a small fortune could be saved in the process.

        Likewise I would hope everyone could agree that simply cutting off funding to those regulatory agencies will do far more harm than good.

         
      • mitchethekid

        September 17, 2013 at 5:21 pm

        Yep. A starved beast can become angry, voracious and focused.

         
 
%d bloggers like this: