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Don Lemon

12 Aug

I want to applaud Don Lemon for having the courage and the presence of mind to say something maybe a little politically inconvenient, but the truth nonetheless. Russell Simmons took Lemon to task over these comments, as did many other prominent black people, but the issue that Lemon brought up has been mentioned by Dr. King, President Obama, and Bill Cosby among others. And that issue is the harm that blacks do to themselves through their own actions outside of any racist elements. I have read, and heard in my own community many times young blacks saying that being “smart” is acting “white” – how preposterous is that? That is a mindset that needs to be done away with. Along with that, the 73% out of wedlock birth rate among the black community and the continued victim attitude are guaranteed recipes for poverty and failure. These rarely mentioned facts don’t stop this black author from agreeing with Lemon to some degree, but then he falls back into the stereotypical trap:

I’ll keep living by the “rules” not because Mr. Lemon says so, but because that is how I was raised. I also know that living by these rules is not going to make me less likely to be killed on the streets of New York. Living by these rules is not going to make my dark skin less threatening to whites. Living by these rules is not going to make me less likely to be harassed by police officers.

Don Lemon’s remarks hurt because, by aligning himself with Bill O’Reilly, a man known for his consistently paternalistic and racist commentary on lower-class black America, he joins a chorus of voices he should’ve thought twice about lending his to. You see, Don Lemon isn’t talking to young black men or even to black people. Like Bill O’ Reilly, his remarks are not intended to uplift the culture, but to inspire paternalistic finger-wagging among those who aren’t a part of it. I could think of a number of things that Don Lemon could really do if he wanted to help the community, and lecturing us through the bully pulpit of cable news isn’t even in the top ten.

Truth be known, because of Affirmative Action, whites are at a disadvantage when it comes to competing in the workplace. And Bill O’Reilly is NOT a racist. Anyone that listens to him as I do, knows that, so the author does himself a disservice by inappropriately demonizing someone who actually just speaks the truth regardless of how hard it is to hear. The fact is that this author and Lemon had a strict and loving family raising them, but unfortunately the majority of young black kids don’t and that is what is at the core of the problem.

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29 Comments

Posted by on August 12, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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29 responses to “Don Lemon

  1. bardolf2

    August 12, 2013 at 1:42 pm

    What a deliciously evil scheme the limousine liberals have cooked up. They don’t want their kids competing with talented kids of any race so here’s what they did.

    1. Push welfare on blacks, destroying the family and most of the chances those kids compete with their own kids.

    2. Put in place affirmative action, knowing that even that won’t enable the fatherless poor to compete with their own brood but it will allow them to compete with the working class whites. This might disadvantage whites as a whole, but actually advantages the elite whites. The disadvantage makes working class whites bitter towards other races and they themselves in large numbers give up because life is an unfair playing field.

    3. The libs send their kids to private schools or pseudo-private schools by moving to exclusive and expensive parts and then let the public schools go to hell. Ivy League for the kiddos is assured.

    But the GOP foils the elite white plans by allowing in millions of hard working Asians who out compete the elites. Finally a huffpost article appears about the unfair playing field for their kids.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jd-rothman/ivy-league-admissions_b_1398145.html

     
  2. bardolf2

    August 12, 2013 at 2:05 pm

     
  3. rustybrown2012

    August 12, 2013 at 2:07 pm

    Cluster,

    Touchy subject, aye? This may come as a shock to you but I generally agree with the thrust of your post. I don’t find anything offensive in what Lemon said; seems he’s encouraging a healthy dose of assimilation to a struggling class.

    I can’t remember the details of the Cosby flap, but I remember the controversy. I thought he was being unfairly vilified for breaching the PC walls of polite discussion. I think the black community stands much to gain by asking some tough questions of itself; ones that don’t reflexively blame caucasians and institutional racism for its problems.

     
    • watsonthethird

      August 12, 2013 at 2:58 pm

      The one thing I would question is Cluster’s statement, “Truth be known, because of Affirmative Action, whites are at a disadvantage when it comes to competing in the workplace.”

      Really? I’d love to see some data on that. I don’t have the data myself, nor am I inclined to attempt to look it up right now (I’m not the one that made the assertion, Cluster did), but I find it highly doubtful that when all things are considered, affirmative action included, that whites are at a disadvantage when it comes to competing in the workplace.

       
      • Cluster

        August 12, 2013 at 3:17 pm

        I don’t have any empirical evidence to support my claim but the nature of the legislation is that if I was in competition for a job with a black person, and that black person was equally qualified for the job, the position would most likely go to the black person. That is what affirmative action is.

         
      • 02casper

        August 12, 2013 at 6:03 pm

        “Truth be known, because of Affirmative Action, whites are at a disadvantage when it comes to competing in the workplace.”

        If that were true, one would expect the unemployment rate for blacks would be lower than that for whites. It isn’t. Other than that I also agree with much of what you said.

         
      • Cluster

        August 12, 2013 at 6:44 pm

        You’re assuming that there is an equal number of qualified blacks to qualified whites, and considering that the black population only comprises approx.14% of the population, that would have to be a large number of qualified blacks per their population. Considering the 73% out of wedlock birth rate, that is unfortunately highly unlikely.

         
      • 02casper

        August 12, 2013 at 7:23 pm

        “You’re assuming that there is an equal number of qualified blacks to qualified whites, and considering that the black population only comprises approx.14% of the population, that would have to be a large number of qualified blacks per their population. Considering the 73% out of wedlock birth rate, that is unfortunately highly unlikely.”

        I’m assuming nothing of the sort. Your statement was that whites are at a disadvantage when competing in the work force. If that were true, I would expect that blacks were being hired at a higher rate (percentage wise) than whites and it would show up in the unemployment rate. That’s not happening.

         
      • Cluster

        August 12, 2013 at 7:46 pm

        Cap,

        The candidates have to be equally qualified. Do you understand that? And you are also over looking the very nature of the Affirmative Action agenda which is to higher the equally qualified black person in favor of the white person.

        But considering you can’t see the nature of the agenda, and feel that it is not effective, should we abolish the law? Is that what you are advocating?

         
      • Cluster

        August 12, 2013 at 7:47 pm

        And whites are at a disadvantage when up against an equally qualified black. That’s the entire nature of the legislation. You might want to read it.

         
      • 02casper

        August 12, 2013 at 8:29 pm

        cluster,
        Just saying the law doesn’t doesn’t seem to be making that much of a difference.

         
      • watsonthethird

        August 12, 2013 at 9:24 pm

        Cluster said, “the nature of the legislation is that if I was in competition for a job with a black person, and that black person was equally qualified for the job, the position would most likely go to the black person.”

        There may be jobs like that, although it has never been the case in any company I have worked for, and I’ve worked for ones whose name you would know. I’ve been involved in a lot of hires, and not once has the race of the candidates played any role whatsoever, whether to the benefit of a minority or not.

        In any event, even if what you describe is true, and it gives black people a small advantage in some circumstances, it doesn’t outweigh the obstacles, particularly ones that aren’t overt. In fact, it sounds like you don’t even think such obstacles exist. That’s the only way I can make sense of a statement that whites are at a disadvantage when it comes to competing in the workplace.

         
    • meursault1942

      August 13, 2013 at 11:12 am

      “I don’t find anything offensive in what Lemon said; seems he’s encouraging a healthy dose of assimilation to a struggling class.”

      Sure; it’s a good aspiration, but (and you knew a “but” was coming), it’s just that: aspirational. And that’s why I think both Lemon and his detractor Cluster quoted are correct. Lemon’s aspiration is a good one, but until it is achieved, the “rules” mentioned in the blockquote are still in effect. It would be nice to be able to exist beyond racism, but in he here-and-now, that’s frequently not feasible.

      And on a related note, I reject the “everything or nothing” approach that plagues so many conversations about race. By that I mean the (false) notion that if you think racism exists, then you must think that everything is racist. That simply is not true. It is indeed true that racism exists in this country, and it is indeed true that Black people suffer the brunt of it (with Hispanics getting a lot of it as well) in everything from hiring to the legal system to, now, voting rights. Do some people use racism as an excuse? Sure. Does that make all claims of racism false? Absolutely not. Is racism something that people can eliminate simply by refusing to acknowledge it? No way.

       
      • rustybrown2012

        August 14, 2013 at 12:26 pm

        M.

        I think the detractor is hyperbolic and all wet. Reminds me of the criticisms of Cosby.

        Lemon never said or implied the rules would make your life “perfect” as Smith claims.

        Smith:
        “Living by these rules is not going to make my dark skin less threatening to whites. Living by these rules is not going to make me less likely to be harassed by police officers.”

        …bullshit. They will.

        And say what you want about O’Reilly, I personally think he’s a pompous horse’s ass who is wrong about 95% of the time, he is right on this issue. A 72% out-of-marriage birthrate is ridiculous and is a HUGE contributing factor to the problems blacks are facing in our society.

        Smith:
        “You see, Don Lemon isn’t talking to young black men or even to black people. Like Bill O’ Reilly, his remarks are not intended to uplift the culture, but to inspire paternalistic finger-wagging among those who aren’t a part of it.”

        Wrong. Smith is saying that Mr. Lemon’s comments don’t jibe with Smith’s own personal reference points and race philosophy therefore Lemon is an Uncle Tom not even speaking to black people, but to his white overlords.

        ..again, bullshit. And disgusting. Who’s doing the finger wagging now, Mr. Smith? We’re at a point where a black man can’t speak out about factual observations in the black community without being labeled a race-traitor.

        Maybe blacks wouldn’t have to worry about profiling so much if they stopped committing such a vastly disproportionate amount of crime:

        http://www.colorofcrime.com/colorofcrime2005.html

         
      • meursault1942

        August 14, 2013 at 1:18 pm

        “Living by these rules is not going to make my dark skin less threatening to whites. Living by these rules is not going to make me less likely to be harassed by police officers.”

        “…bullshit. They will.”

        How, exactly? OK, so a 16-year-old black kid wakes up one day and decides he’s going to start following Lemon’s advice, and right that very moment, the racial profiling and police harassment stop? His socioeconomic status suddenly rockets up? Racism just disappears?

        Nope, it doesn’t work that way. Again, Lemon’s advice is good, but it’s aspirational, and its results won’t be instantaneous. And until those results are achieved, that kid still has to deal with the reality of the here-and-now.

         
      • rustybrown2012

        August 14, 2013 at 1:40 pm

        M.

        How? Yeah, by your example if a black dude with his pants around his waist is walking to school with his books he will most likely not be stopped, especially since there is no shortage of stoned-out black guys with their pants around their knees for the police to harass. The effort is getting more black kids to go to school eager to learn rather than hang around with the gang bangers. Maybe a strong father figure would be helpful to that goal. See how that works?

        Nobody said the results are instantaneous. Nobody said this will make racism disappear. Can you point me to where that was said? No, Lemon’s advice is to the black community about how the black community can begin to lift itself up. There should be no controversy about that, but there is because it would seem the black community cannot be faulted in any way without pushback from black activists and apologists.

         
      • GMB

        August 15, 2013 at 12:20 pm

        “Maybe blacks wouldn’t have to worry about profiling so much if they stopped committing such a vastly disproportionate amount of crime:”

        Yes but how many of those crimes are simple possession of recreational drugs for personal use. How many of those crimes are for possession with the intent to deliver? When we the people start demanding that these are not crimes and when we the people start refusing to convict anyone regardless of race, for these crimes, we might just be headed in the right direction.

        We the people, if we want to keep our freedom, we need to quit electing people, who only see dollar signs when they think about the war on drugs. The confiscation of bank accounts, cash, and personal property has become big business for our government agency’s.

        We allow this intrusion on our freedom.

         
      • rustybrown2012

        August 17, 2013 at 8:18 pm

        GMB,

        We’re in agreement that our drug laws are bullshit and disproportionally punish minorities. My link emphasizes the overrepresentation of blacks in VIOLENT crimes. Not so easy to dismiss.

         
  4. ricorun

    August 14, 2013 at 7:50 am

    Hi all, this is ricorun. On B4B/B4V you may have known me as “ricorun”. Very similar nicknames. Anyway, Casper turned me on to this site. It looks good so far. I wish y’all luck! I’ve often wondered what caused B4V to descend into such rancor. I suppose the reasons include their uneven moderation policy, the fact that their ultimate agenda was electing Republicans (preferably Tea Party types) rather than discussion, and the glorification of ignorance. Not stupidity, mind you, but ignorance. Stupidity is innate, ignorance is correctable (should one be so inclined). Maybe if you can fix those things you’ll have a better shot at stimulating real debate. I hope so, because it used to be a lot of fun talking to the folks on B4B.

    Anyway, concerning the topic, an academician (who is also black) named Stuart Buck wrote a long thesis on the disdain many blacks have for the success enjoyed by some of their fellows called “Acting White”. His basic argument is that one of the unfortunate consequences of desegregation was that black schoolchildren lost their black role models in the form of black teachers and school administrators. After desegregation all black schools were largely shut down, not integrated. That left only previously all white schools, with their white faculty and administration largely intact. There are other elements involved of course (his thesis is in the form of a book). It’s certainly a thorny subject for a lot of black folks, not to mention a lot of bleeding heart liberals, but he builds a pretty convincing case.

    I’d say more but I’m kinda busy. I just wanted to say hi and wish y’all luck.

     
    • rustybrown2012

      August 14, 2013 at 11:55 am

      Rico,

      I agree that desegregation has had unintended negative impacts (mostly ignored by today’s media), but don’t you think that for decades now black kids have had plenty of black “teachers and school administrators” to look up to for role models? It might have been true that there was some type of “assimilation shock” moving from a black structure to a mostly white structure, but I hardly think that’s been relevant for quite some time.

       
      • ricorun

        August 15, 2013 at 11:09 am

        For decades now? No, I don’t believe that’s the case. Things are improving, but I think it’s still rather difficult for your average black kid to point to “plenty” of black role models — in any profession, short of sports or entertainment. More specifically, think it’s still not uncommon for a black person who has “made it” to be accused of “acting white” by his/her less fortunate black peers on the one hand, and of getting to the place they are because of preferential treatment by his/her white ones on the other. Though details differ of course, it seems to me that the same sort of dynamics play out for women in the workplace as well, especially those aspiring to positions of real power.

         
      • rustybrown2012

        August 15, 2013 at 12:47 pm

        Rico,

        Well, If blacks are underrepresented as teachers and administrators and “role models” I guess the question would be why? Another question is should a community need “role models” in order to thrive? Shouldn’t your role models primarily be your mother, father, and strong family/community support? When speaking of role models, shouldn’t the 72% out of wedlock birthrate for blacks be the first item of discussion, before desegregation for example?

         
      • ricorun

        August 16, 2013 at 7:35 am

        Rusty: Well, If blacks are underrepresented as teachers and administrators and “role models” I guess the question would be why?

        Rusty, the way I see it, and what the available evidence indicates, is that what we have operating is a self-perpetuating vicious circle. If “acting white” involves rejecting academic excellence, then all sorts of professions are precluded, including teaching and administrating. Likewise, if “acting white” involves getting criticized for taking unfair advantage of affirmative action programs, that can weigh on a person as well. Peer pressure and self-esteem are powerful forces among adolescents — all adolescents. It therefore stands to reason that the above dynamics would have deleterious effects on black youth.

        Another question is should a community need “role models” in order to thrive? Shouldn’t your role models primarily be your mother, father, and strong family/community support?

        Family and community support are indeed important. But again, especially during the adolescent years, peer pressure and self esteem are also powerful forces. And for too many black youths, pretty much all of those things are working against them. So yeah, I think role models are, particularly important for them. To switch gears just a little bit, I was listening to a piece on NPR the other day about why there were so few women in science and engineering. They went over various lines of evidence, and basically it boiled down to this: the reason there are so few women in science and engineering is because there are so few women in science and engineering. In other words, though women have a lot of that other stuff working for them, what they don’t have is appropriate role models.

        The high out of wedlock birthrate among blacks is tragic. But so is the high unemployment/under-employment rate among black men (especially young ones). Combine that with the fact that the Aid to Families With Dependent Children program distributes more money to single parent families than two parent ones, and perhaps you get a feel for what may be behind that high out of wedlock birthrate. And that also feeds the vicious cycle.

        Completely off topic: it sure is nice to discuss things without all the shouting, ad hominem attacks, and other juvenile tactics common on other sites.

         
      • ricorun

        August 16, 2013 at 7:39 am

        I tried to put rusty’s comments in italics, but apparently this site doesn’t pick up on html codes. So my above comment is a little hard to read. Sorry about that.

         
      • GMB

        August 16, 2013 at 9:57 am

        “Rusty, the way I see it, and what the available evidence indicates, is that what we have operating is a self-perpetuating vicious circle.”

        I would have to disagree some with this statement. It is not imo a self-perpetuating cycle. We keep electing politicians on both sides of the isle who have a vested interest in keeping the cycle going.

        Any politician who would try to end the continuous welfare handouts is going to hounded into submission by the radical left.

        You be the judge on who the main benefactor is when the poor have just barely enough scrape by month to month. When was the last time you saw a headline that read, “Government program achieves it’s intended result and has now ended.”

         
      • ricorun

        August 16, 2013 at 11:41 am

        gmb: “I would have to disagree some with this statement. It is not imo a self-perpetuating cycle. We keep electing politicians on both sides of the isle who have a vested interest in keeping the cycle going.”

        Let me get this straight… you say “it is not a self-pepetuating cycle”, and then you say, “We keep electing politicians on both sides of the isle who have a vested interest in keeping the cycle going”.

        Uh… isn’t that self-contradictory?

        Or are you saying that the problem is not intrinsic but externally imposed by both parties? If it’s the latter, then in principle, I’m inclined to partially agree. I think both political parties have done a great job of manipulating the problem to suit their political interests, but a piss-poor job of actually trying to solve it. What I tried to say in my previous comment is that the causes of the present situation are complexly entangled. To attribute blame to one cause or another exclusively, as opposed to attacking them all at once (or as many of them as possible), is not likely to help. In short, what’s necessary to break the self-perpetuating cycle in the least amount of time is an all-out frontal assault. Moreover, even if you do everything absolutely right, it’s virtually impossible for such a change to bear real fruit in the span of just one generation. We’re talking people here. People have memories, and they’re inclined to transmit them to their kids and their grandkids. I constantly marvel at those who forget that simple fact: we’re talking about people here.

         
      • rustybrown2012

        August 17, 2013 at 8:26 pm

        Rico,

        I don’t necessarily disagree with you, but I was posting about what I perceived was the topic of this thread: the PC dictates that shame anyone for suggesting the black community take some responsibility for getting it’s house in order, thus attempting to prohibit that discussion. Do you have any thoughts on that issue?

         
  5. mitchethekid

    August 14, 2013 at 10:12 am

    Welcome! Feel free to be a regular. But there is no point in engaging the B4V folks. So we don’t. That’s why Cluster and I started this blog. Tell all your friends! Maybe soon we will be giving away valuable prizes. 🙂

     
  6. GMB

    August 14, 2013 at 11:24 pm

    “And say what you want about O’Reilly, I personally think he’s a pompous horse’s ass”

    I’m glad I’m not alone in thinking that. LOL

    B4B/B4V only wants to elect TEA Party types? Really? I thought rinoism was the party line there.

    “Maybe soon we will be giving away valuable prizes.”

    I recommend a free lifetime subscription to this blog, oh and a tee shirt. 😛

     
 
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